New study reveals many B.C. residents have too many electronics | Squamish Chief

New study reveals many B.C. residents have too many electronics

A new study from BC Hydro suggests almost three-quarters of B.C. residents feel overwhelmed by the amount of electronics they accumulate over the holidays.

The survey conducted in the study also found that 13 per cent of residents believe they have more electronics than they need. 

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The research also found that 22 per cent of residents give out electronic presents over the holidays and more than 50 per cent purchased electronics during Boxing Day sales.

For those who obtain newer models of cellphones, including the latest iPhones, 16 per cent will keep their older models. 

Compared to 2010, B.C. residents own 50 per cent more electronics than before. Electricity used by smaller electronics has almost hit an increase of 150 per cent from the early 1990s. 

Despite the buzz for new electronics, 77 per cent of residents hold on to retro electronics. Thirty-three per cent of people own a VCR, almost 50 per cent have a cassette or CD player, 13 per cent have a Discman or Walkman, nearly 30 per cent have a SEGA or Nintendo and 66 per cent have a DVD player.

Those wanting to get rid of old electronics, especially older model televisions which are known sources of standby power usage, can recycle them at any Return-It recycling depots across the province. 

 

Read the original article here.

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